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Artwork depicting Grissom and its Airman unveiled

A painting of a C17 Globemaster being loaded by Airmen from the 49th Aerial Port Squadron at Grissom Air Reserve Base, Indiana was unveiled this fall at the 2019 IRT joint planning meeting for operational mission planners in Tysons Corner, Virginia. (U.S. Air Force painting by Senior Master Sgt. Darby Perrin)

A painting of a C17 Globemaster being loaded by Airmen from the 49th Aerial Port Squadron at Grissom Air Reserve Base, Indiana was unveiled this fall at the 2019 IRT joint planning meeting for operational mission planners in Tysons Corner, Virginia. (U.S. Air Force painting by Senior Master Sgt. Darby Perrin)

Senior Master Sgt. Darby Perrin, Air Force Reserve Command heritage and combat artist, creates a color sketch of a C17 Globemaster at Grissom Air Reserve Base, Indiana April 18, 2019. The sketch will be used to create a larger studio painting. (U.S. Air Force photo/Lt. Col. Warren Neary)

Senior Master Sgt. Darby Perrin, Air Force Reserve Command heritage and combat artist, creates a color sketch of a C17 Globemaster at Grissom Air Reserve Base, Indiana April 18, 2019. The sketch will be used to create a larger studio painting. (U.S. Air Force photo/Lt. Col. Warren Neary)

GRISSOM AIR RESERVE BASE, Ind. --

Paintings are often referred to as visual diaries and Grissom Air Reserve Base recently added a page to a much larger diary.

A heritage and combat artist team from Air Force Reserve Command visited Grissom in April to capture research material for artwork.

During their visit the artists watched and sketched as the 49th Aerial Port Squadron loaded medical and civil engineering assets onto a C-17 Globemaster bound for a project in Puerto Rico. 

The artists turned their sketches into a painting depicting the moment.

“We think the painting depicts the men and women of Grissom at work,” said Staff Sgt. Marshall Vondy, 49th APS asset management technician.

“Artwork is used to preserve a visual record of our Reserve Citizen Airmen culture,” said Lt. Col. Warren Neary, Air Force Reserve Command chief of heritage and combat art division, who was part of the team. “The visual record provides context and draws interest in a deeper understanding of our written history.”

The heritage and combat artwork is used in education and outreach materials to inform and inspire appreciation for AFRC missions and its Airmen. The artwork also facilities professional military education, training and retention and recruiting efforts.

The finished painting was unveiled this fall at the 2019 IRT Joint Planning Meeting for Operational Mission Planners in Tysons Corner, Virginia.

The 434th ARW is the largest KC-135R unit in the AFRC. Airmen and aircraft from the 434th ARW routinely deploy around the world in support of the Air Force mission and U.S. strategic objectives.

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